Summer Update for Laid-Off Lawyers

What do you say to a recent law school graduate?

“A double-shot latte to go, please.”

Cruel but often true.

From New York to LA, the downturn of the past two years has hit the legal profession with unprecedented severity … and it’s certainly not limited to new grads. Tens of thousands of lawyers and staff – more than 31,000 at last count – have lost their jobs in the Great Recession. Now, with the country’s unemployment hovering around 10% — and summer just around the corner — many professionals are on the hunt for the right job. But what job?

To the rescue are a handful of effective, inexpensive online career-assessment tests that aim to help unemployed lawyers and others identify suitable jobs and work environments.

The first four were recently identified in a recent Wall Street Journal, and we at LawyerAvenue found a half-dozen other assessments that are definitely worth considering:

CareerKey (www.careerkey.org) — Assigns users to one or more of six personality types and helps identify occupations most likely to fit their profile. Developed at North Carolina State University’s College of Education. $9.95

Kolbe Corp. (www.kolbe.com) — A 36-question instrument that measures innate skills and talents and matches you with careers that lets you use them. The Kolbe A Index and the Career MO+ assessment. $63.95.

Motivational Appraisal of Personal Potential (www.assessment.com) — The online package offers a vocational analysis, a narrative interpretation of your ratings in nine trait groups, a personalized 20-page report, and a summary of your top six motivators. $19.99 for test, and a list of 20 likely professional fits, and a narrative about your results. More detailed analysis available.

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (www.capt.org) — $165 for online assessment, a one-hour phone appointment, and reading materials.

Here are a few other notable online assessments:

Career Discovery (www.CareerDiscovery.com) — Career assessment tool co-developed by Tim Butler, director of Harvard’s MBA Career Development program, and author of Getting Unstuck: How Dead Ends Become New Paths. The test defines a “universe of possible business careers” in which one could express their interests. $95 (password-protected, good for 60 days).

DISC Classic Profile (www.discprofile.com) — Well-established online assessment tool. Identifies and measures work style patterns in four personality categories. From the home page, click on the DiSC Classic Profile ($25.95), or an enhanced version called The Classic 2+ ($59.95).

Focus Career (www.FocusCareer.com) — Developed by the same design team that pioneered IBM’s computer-based, career-planning program. Widely used career-planning system; $39.95.

Jackson Vocational Interest Survey (www.jvis.com) — This educational and career-planning tool offers a detailed snapshot of interests and how they relate to the world of work. Created by a former President of the American Psychological Association’s Division of Measurement, Evaluation and Statistics. Takes about 40 minutes to complete; highly detailed report, $19.95.

The Keirsey Temperament Sorter (www.keirsey.com) — A temperament and work personality assessment. Inividualized, 70-question assessments range in price from $11.95 to $19.95.

Self-Directed Search (www.self-directed-search.com) — Discover the careers that best match your interests. An online assessment based on the occupation codes popularized by Dr. John Holland. Requires 20-30 minutes to complete. A personalized report is e-mailed to users along with a list of the occupations and fields of study that most closely match their interests. $9.95.

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